Dietary exclusions do not improve atopic eczema in adults and children

Atopic eczema is the most common inflammatory skin disease of childhood in developed countries.

The study authors performed a systematic review of 9 randomized controlled trials to assess the effects of dietary exclusions in atopic eczema:

- 6 studies of egg and milk exclusion
- 1 study of few foods
- 2 studies of an elemental diet

There was no benefit of either diet in unselected cases of atopic eczema

There may be some benefit of egg-free diet in infants with suspected egg allergy who have positive specific IgE to eggs (51% improvement in body surface area).

The authors concluded that despite their frequent use, there was little evidence to support the use of exclusion diets in atopic eczema.

References:

Dietary exclusions for improving established atopic eczema in adults and children: systematic review. Bath-Hextall F, Delamere FM, Williams HC. Allergy. 2009 Feb;64(2):258-64.

Related reading:

The long history of dieting fads: "soap should be eaten for its diuretic properties", wrote a prominent surgeon in 1810. Lancet, 2012.

Image source: OpenClipArt.org, public domain.

2 comments:

  1. I'm not surprised by this because I was born with eczema and I was put on diets as a child to deal with my eczema but I could never stick to it. I was told not to do dairy and citrus but I still did it and I still do. However, I noticed living in different regions of the USA that my eczema either improved or it got worse. I lived in the midwest (Iowa) for awhile and I did break out a lot but when I moved to the East Coast my break outs have not been that bad. Thank you for sharing.

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  2. Anonymous3/09/2009

    "I'm not surprised by this because I was born with eczema and I was put on diets as a child to deal with my eczema but I could never stick to it."

    Exactly. The study confirms the experience you kindly shared with us.

    ReplyDelete

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